From the Racetrack to the Production Line


“A unique experience”

Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, Member of the Board of Management of the Volkswagen Brand with responsibility for Development (photo)

DR. ULRICH HACKENBERG, MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT OF THE VOLKSWAGEN BRAND WITH RESPONSIBILITY FOR DEVELOPMENT, EXPLAINS WHY HIGH EMOTION AND HARD-HEADED BENEFIT ANALYSES TEAM UP WELL IN MOTORSPORT.

Dr. Hackenberg, as someone who races cars himself, could you explain what is so fascinating?
In motorsport, you have the fascination of speed together with the challenge of mastering the technology. Taking part in the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring allows me to demonstrate that I identify completely with the team and with Volkswagen technology. Exploring the limits of technology in such a demanding competition is a truly unique experience.

How do the Group brands benefit from being involved in motorsport?
If we can hold our own in the tough competitive environment of motorsport, this vouches for the performance of our cars. Money can’t buy you a victory on the racetrack, so this form of advertising has added credibility.

Volkswagen was the first carmaker to win the Dakar Rally with a diesel engine. Was this a very special moment for you?
We were absolutely over the moon – the racing team and Volkswagen’s development staff all did sterling work. After all, you need to be fast and reliable to win the toughest endurance rally in the world. Our triple victory in 2010 once again allowed us to showcase our diesel expertise to an audience of over a billion people worldwide.

How do motorsport successes help to enhance the technology used in series-produced cars?
Audi’s quattro drive revolutionized rally sport and is now an established fixture in powerful series-produced cars. The same goes for direct fuel injection for petrol engines – this was tried out by Audi on the racetrack for the first time in 2001 and now powers millions of series-produced vehicles. The twincharger technology used in the Dakar engines is now also making its way into series vehicles with the four-cylinder TDI engine in the Amarok and the T5.

Is the technology transfer generally greater the closer the racing cars are to series technology?
Yes, that’s right. The Scirocco GT24 showed on the Nürburgring “Nordschleife” that a car with front-wheel drive can really race. And there are only minor differences between the new Cup Scirocco and the sporty series-produced “R” model.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
www.volkswagen-motorsport.com
www.volkswagen-group-motorsport.info

Learning from motorsport

TOUGH RACETRACKS, SPECTACULAR TOURING CARS: MOTORSPORT IS THE ULTIMATE TESTING ENVIRONMENT FOR TECHNICAL ADVANCES IN SERIES-PRODUCED CARS.

Skoda Fabia Super 2000 – As Škoda’s motorsport department is part of its Technical Development division, synergies between racing and series-produced cars are easy to achieve. (photo)

ŠKODA FABIA SUPER 2000
As Škoda’s motorsport department is part of its Technical Development division, synergies between racing and series-produced cars are easy to achieve.

Volkswagen Jetta TDI Cup – In the first ever US diesel cup, Volkswagen was represented by a low-sulfur clean diesel model. The new technology functioned well under the conditions of the contest. (photo)

VOLKSWAGEN JETTA TDI CUP
In the first ever US diesel cup, Volkswagen was represented by a low-sulfur clean diesel model. The new technology functioned well under the conditions of the contest.

Volkswagen Scirocco GT24-CNG – The natural gas-powered racing car boasts a special mixture formation to optimize the balance between the exhaust gas temperature and maximum turbo potential. (photo)

VOLKSWAGEN SCIROCCO GT24-CNG
The natural gas-powered racing car boasts a special mixture formation to optimize the balance between the exhaust gas temperature and maximum turbo potential.

Volkswagen Race Touareg – The Dakar winner has a body made of carbon-reinforced plastic. At present, Volkswagen is also experimenting with this material to develop light low-fuel cars. (photo)

VOLKSWAGEN RACE TOUAREG
The Dakar winner has a body made of carbon-reinforced plastic. At present, Volkswagen is also experimenting with this material to develop light low-fuel cars.

Audi A4 DTM – When accelerating, the Audi A4 DTM interrupts the charging of the alternator, thus boosting the propulsion power. In series-produced models, this technology can help to reduce fuel consumption. (photo)

AUDI A4 DTM
When accelerating, the Audi A4 DTM interrupts the charging of the alternator, thus boosting the propulsion power. In series-produced models, this technology can help to reduce fuel consumption.

SEAT WTCC – The repeat touring champion SEAT Leon TDI is based on the series-produced diesel model. The engine block and cylinder head are unchanged, demonstrating their durability even under extreme racing conditions. (photo)

SEAT WTCC
The repeat touring champion SEAT Leon TDI is based on the series-produced diesel model. The engine block and cylinder head are unchanged, demonstrating their durability even under extreme racing conditions.

Audi R8 LMS – With the GT3 racing version of the R8, Audi Sport developed its first ever racing car designed specifically for amateur racing. In the endurance test: near-series V10 FSI engines. (photo)

AUDI R8 LMS
With the GT3 racing version of the R8, Audi Sport developed its first ever racing car designed specifically for amateur racing. In the endurance test: near-series V10 FSI engines.

Audi R15 TDI – At Le Mans, Audi tested new diesel particulate filters and headlights with LED dipped beams, which are to be used in future for series-produced models. (photo)

AUDI R15 TDI
At Le Mans, Audi tested new diesel particulate filters and headlights with LED dipped beams, which are to be used in future for series-produced models.

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